Acronyms and Course Descriptions


Acronyms for Graduate Courses

ANSC Animal Science

BIOL Biology

BIOT Biotechnology

CHEM Chemistry

COUN Counseling

ECSP Early Childhood/Exceptional Child

EDLD Education Leadership

EDMG Middle Grades Education

EDSC School Counselor Education

EDUC Education (not program specific)

ENGL English

ENVH Environmental Health

FVSU Fort Valley State University

GEOG Geography

GEOL Geology

GERO Gerontology

HLTH Health

MATH Mathematics

MLHC Mental Health Counseling

RCCM Rehabilitation Counseling and Case Management

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Graduate Course Descriptions

ANSC 5293 Advanced Vertebrate Physiology 3 hours
Students will learn the organ systems and physiology of the cellular, nervous, muscular, endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and digestive systems. The course will provide understanding of the integrated functioning of cells and systems in selected vertebrate species.

ANSC 5323 Advanced Gross Anatomy 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 3823
Students will learn the anatomy of endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and digestive systems. The course will provide an understanding of the integrated structure-function relationship of systems in farm animals.

ANSC 5183 Analytical Techniques in Biological Sciences 3 hours
Students will acquire both theoretical and practical experience in analyzing materials for organic and inorganic components, and biological samples for enzymes, hormones and body metabolites.

ANSC 5103 Biometrics 3 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 or MATH 2113 or with consent of the instructor/advisor.
Students will learn the theory and experience related to collection, analysis, and interpretation of biological data. Some of the principal tools used in statistics for making inferences will be discussed, and the mathematical basis of these tools will be explained. The students will acquire knowledge in sampling, parametric and non-parametric methods, introduction to experimental design, including completely random, randomized block, split plot, Latin Square, and factorial experiments, analysis of variance, and various tests of significance

ANSC 5203 Experimental Design and Data Analysis 3 hours
Prerequisites ANSC 5893
Students will understand the theoretical basis and practical application of experimental design to biological studies. They will acquire knowledge in use of analysis of variance and mean separation techniques for specific experimental designs, including completely random, randomized block, split plot, and Latin Square experiments.

ANSC 5113 Physiological Chemistry I 3 hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 3250K
Students will acquire concepts pertaining to the structure of the major biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids) with emphasis on the relationship of structure to function, structure and action of enzymes, and principles of bioenergetics.

ANSC 5123 Physiological Chemistry II 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 5113
Students will learn major metabolic pathways for carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, protein, and nucleic acids, emphasizing oxidative processes and biosynthesis of RNA, DNA and protein, and regulation of cellular metabolism.

ANSC 5213 Lactation Physiology 3 hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 2202 and ANSC 1801
Students will learn the physiology of milk production with emphasis on mammary gland development, anatomy, hormonal control of milk secretion, and biosynthesis of milk constituents.

ANSC 6001 Comprehensive Review 0 hour
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the Animal Science discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U.

ANSC 6103 Plant-Herbivore Interactions 3 hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 2202 and ANSC 1801 or equivalent courses
Students will learn the principles of herbivore grazing behavior, diet selection, and forage utilization with special emphasis on interactions at the plant-animal interface.

ANSC 6133 Mineral and Vitamin Metabolism 3 hours

Prerequisite: ANSC 5123 or and an equivalent course
Students will learn the nutritional significance of vitamins and minerals in animal metabolism; chemical, biochemical, and physiological roles of vitamins and minerals, and homeostatic controls in an animal metabolism.

ANSC 6143 Ruminant Nutrition 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 5123 and ANSC 3823 or equivalent courses
Students will acquire knowledge in current concepts in anatomy, physiology of digestion, and metabolism in ruminant nutrition and their relationships to nutritional practice and research.

ANSC 6153 Animal Energetics 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 5123 and ANSC 5103
Students will understand energy transformation and expenditure associated with various physiological processes at cellular, tissue, and organismic levels as affected by diet and physiological state.

ANSC 6163 Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism 3 hours
Prerequisites: ANSC 5123
Students will acquire an understanding of recent advances in protein metabolism. Emphasis will be on physiological and nutritional significance; discussion of protein digestion; absorption of peptides; absorption, synthesis, and degradation of amino acids; hormonal and nutritional regulation of protein turnover; and determination of protein quality and requirements.

ANSC 6173 Non-Ruminant Nutrition 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 5123
Students will acquire knowledge of comparative nutrition of nonruminant vertebrate animals; including laboratory and companion animals, domestic livestock; relation of nutrition to metabolic adaptations and physiological state.

ANSC 6223 Digestive Physiology and Intermediary Metabolism 3 hours
Prerequisites: ANSC 5123
Students will acquire knowledge of an interrelationship among nutrients, nutritional states, and metabolic processes with understanding of metabolism and metabolic regulation through, biochemistry and physiology.

ANSC 6253 Molecular Endocrinology 3 hours
Prerequisite ANSC 4833
Students will acquire an in-depth understanding of the molecular basis of hormone action and molecular and cell biology of endocrine systems. Other areas include detailed investigation of hormone and receptor synthesis, second messenger models, hormonal control of gene expression, and molecular mechanisms of growth and reproduction. Students will make critical reviews of the literature and will gain thorough knowledge of newly-emerging techniques in endocrinology.

ANSC 6273 Cell Physiology 3 hours
Prerequisite ANSC 5293
Students will acquire knowledge of cell type, structure, function and physiology. They will also learn the techniques of in vitro cell culture and its importance in reproduction and biomedical science.

ANSC 6283 Physiology of Reproduction 3 hours
Prerequisite ANSC 3823 and ANSC 4833
Students will learn the development of structure and function of the reproductive system. In-depth coverage of the molecular, cellular, physiological, immunological and embryological mechanisms involving the endocrine and reproductive systems of farm animals; evaluation and discussions of current theories based on scientific publications.

ANSC 6303 Molecular Biology Techniques 3 hours
Prerequisite ANSC 2813
Students will thoroughly understand concepts and techniques used in molecular biology and the role of this technology in both basic and applied animal research. Students will gain practical experience in the laboratory using some of the most common techniques in molecular biology.

ANSC 6333 Methods of Experimental Surgery 3 hours
Prerequisite ANSC 5323 or equivalent courses
Students will gain a thorough understanding of principles of surgery, anesthesiology and common operations, techniques and procedures pertaining to animal reproduction and nutrition research.

ANSC 6353 Food Analysis 3 hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 2222K, CHEM 3250K
Students will learn the principles and methodologies of classical and instrumental analysis of foods and will also gain practical experience with sample preparation, application of analytical techniques, and assessment of results. Students will then be given the opportunity to apply their knowledge and experience by assessing products in the food and feed industries.

ANSC 6373 Food Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisites: CHEM 2222K, CHEM 3250K
Students will acquire knowledge on composition, structure and functional properties of food constituents and their contributions to physical, organoleptic and nutritive characteristics of food products. Students will also learn the chemical reactions occurring during food processing, storage and utilization.

ANSC 6383 Structure and Biochemistry of Muscle as Food 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 3813
Students will gain knowledge of ultra structure and composition of animal tissues that comprise edible meat, physicochemical changes in postmortem muscle, and biochemical events leading to the conversion of muscle to meat.

ANSC 6393 Dairy Products Technology 3 hours
Prerequisite: ANSC 4853
Students will understand the theory and acquire practical experience in manufacturing and quality control procedures with various dairy products based on physico-chemical, nutritional, organoleptic, food quality, and processing engineering principles.

ANSC 6403 Processed Meat Technology 3 hours
Students will acquire knowledge in production, quality assessment, and marketing of various further-processed meat products. Students will also gain knowledge of the nutritive value of raw materials used in the products as well as the methodologies involved in drying, pickling, curing, smoking, canning, and cooking. During laboratory sessions, students will gain hands-on skills in preparation and quality assessment of value-added meat products.

ANSC 6413 Food Microbiology 3 hours
Students will acquire knowledge of sources of food borne infections and poisonings including factors affecting the growth of microbes in food, microorganisms of concern in milk and meat foods, their detection and control. Laboratory periods will focus on techniques involved in the detection, isolation, growth, and control of different food pathogens.

ANSC 6421 Graduate Seminars 3 hours
Students will participate in the discussion of important current developments in animal science, and review current literature on selected topics. They will learn and practice techniques of preparing and making effective scientific presentations to their peers and faculty using the latest technology. This course may be repeated for additional credit.

ANSC 6423 Food Quality Assurance 3 hours
Students will gain a comprehensive knowledge of quality control procedures in various stages of food processing. Assessment and control of microbial, nutritional, and eating qualities will be individually emphasized. Special attention will be focused on the importance of HACCP principles in food quality assurance as well as federal and state regulations. During laboratory sessions, students will gain hands-on experience in food quality assessment and control.

ANSC 6436 Research and Thesis 6 hours
Students will design original research in animal and food sciences, collect data, analyze and interpret results for their master’s thesis.

BIOL 5103 Issues in Environmental Science 3 hours
Students will gain an advanced perspective of ecological problems and consequences while continuing to investigate principles of Ecology, Biology and Chemistry for a better understanding of the relationship between humans and the environment. They will add to their knowledge base for evaluating personal, societal and political alternatives on environmental issues, especially those affecting human health.

BIOL 5243 Human Anatomy 3 hours
Students will have an understanding of the structure and function of human body parts and relationships between structure and function. The important structures and functions of the nervous, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, glandular, muscular and reproductive systems will be covered.

BIOL 5334 Environmental Microbiology 2 hours lecture/3 hours lab
Students will review the role of microbes in the environment and their effect on food and water quality. They also study the use of microbes in treatment processes and as indicator organisms.

BIOL 5354 Physiological Toxicology 3 hours
Students study the physiological effects of various air, water and soil contaminants and food additives on human health, domestic livestock and economically important plants. Students cover mechanisms of absorption, distribution, excretion and biotransformation of toxicants as well as an overview of toxicity testing methods.

BIOT 5103 Biostatistics and Experimental Designs 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
In this course students will understand the theoretical basis and practical applications of various experimental designs to biological studies. They will acquire knowledge in use of the analysis of variance and mean separation techniques for specific experimental designs including completely randomized, randomized block, split plot, and Latin square experiments.

BIOT 5123 Physiological Chemistry 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will learn about major metabolic pathways for carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, protein, and nucleic acids, emphasizing oxidative processes and biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins, and regulation of cellular metabolism.

BIOT 5253 Advanced Biotechniques 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
In this course, students will learn basic principles of laboratory techniques and instruments used in modern biotechnology. They will gain an understanding of applications of different techniques used in various research areas through discussion of published literature. Students will also acquire hands-on experience of molecular techniques and biotechnology instrumentation through laboratory experiments and exercises designed to test hypothetical research objectives.

BIOT 5333 Animal Growth Biology 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOT 5123 and Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed for students to understand the cellular and molecular aspects of animal growth and tissue development, with emphasis placed on meat animals. Through lectures and laboratory classes students will comprehend the interface of animal growth biology with other disciplines such as stress physiology, nutrition, genetics, and the environment.

BIOT 5373 Plant Tissue and Cell Culture 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSCI 4863 or Equivalent and Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed for students to comprehend knowledge pertaining to totipotency and different techniques utilized for culturing plant cells, tissues and organs for rapid and efficient whole plant regeneration using in vitro culture conditions. Students will acquire hands-on experience and get a personal interest in micropropagating elite / desirable plant germplasm available or acquired for the purpose of further research or commercialization.

BIOT 5403 Molecular Genetics and Bioinformatics 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 4254K and Graduate Committee Consent
Students in this course will review the structure of nucleic acids, fundamental properties of genes and chromosomes. They will get comprehensive knowledge of replicating machinery, maintenance, and alterations of genetic material. Students will also be exposed to bioinformatics tools available to extract the biological information from nucleic acids and protein sequences in the genetical analysis.

BIOT 5483 Molecular Marker Technology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Through this course students will acquire knowledge of various types of molecular markers and DNA fingerprinting procedures, techniques used in the development and detection of molecular markers, and application of these techniques towards improving agricultural productivity while enhancing agricultural genetic diversity. Students will gain hands-on experience along with knowledge of these techniques through an assortment of laboratory exercises.

BIOT 5503 Advanced Genetics 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 4254K and Graduate Committee Consent
This course has been designed as an advanced study for students who have already completed genetics and molecular biology courses. A diverse array of topics addressing gene systems in various cells from plants, animals, fungi and prokaryotes will be discussed. Recent scientific literature on genetic techniques, cancer and genetics, stem cell potential, gene replacement and therapy, as well as developmental genetics will be discussed.

BIOT 5543 Gene Transfer and Expression 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSCI 4863 and Graduate Committee Consent
In here students will comprehend knowledge of basic techniques/methods of gene transfer in plants and animals, cutting and joining DNA molecules, vectors and cloning vehicles such as plasmids, bacteriophases, and cosmids. Discussions will focus on cloning strategies, gene libraries, analyzing DNA sequences, cDNA cloning, recombinant selection/screening, gene expression / recombinant DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and southern blot transgenics studies.

BIOT 5555 Biological Microtechniques 3 Hours
A study of the structure and development of vascular plant tissues and organs. Chemistry and use of fixatives and dyes; histochemistry emphasizes procedures used in research labs including techniques for enzymes, protein carbohydre, nucleic acids and lipids. Selected procedures to demonstrate the fundamentals of histochemical and immunocytochemical labeling methods. Laboratory work includes preparation of hand and paraffin sections (microtomy) staining preparation of samples for electron microscopy and observation of plant tissues using light, fluorescent and scanning electron microscopy.

BIOT 5613 Embryo Transfer Technology 3 Hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
In this course students will understand and know the techniques involved in embryo transfer and related biotechnologies including the gamete and embryo processing and recovery, in vitro maturation and fertilization, somatic cell micromanipulation, cell cryopreservation, cloning of embryos, chimera formation, embryonic stem and adult cell line production, gamete and embryo sexing, nuclear and gene transfer, and transgenesis.

BIOT 5661 Technical and Scientific Writing Methods 1 hour
This course is designed to acquaint students with the knowledge and hands-on experience related to the fundamentals of preparing and disseminating their research findings and results.  Class discussions will emphasize presenting research for scientific publications, report writing, and other formal/informal written presentations.  Focus will be on the problem identification and rationale, previous work and future outlook, experimental materials and collected data, evaluation of results and report writing for disseminating significant finds as appropriate.

BIOT 5753 Bioengineering 3 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111, MATH 1112, CHEM 1211, CHEM 1212, -3250K, PHYS 1111, PHYS 1112K, BIOL 4234K
The objective of this course is to introduce students to the application of genetic engineering principles to the problems in biological systems. This course will focus on the topics like biomechanics, principles of food mechanics, and energy and mass transport with an emphasis on application to the living systems, principles and unique properties of biological materials, and mechanics of circulation and blood rheology.

BIOT 5800 Special Topics in Biotechnology 1-3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the Biotechnology discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

BIOT 5883 Biotechnology Teaching Methods 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed to develop competences in organizing, planning specific units of instruction, developing teaching techniques, and teaching in-school and out-of-school people. There will be supervision of practice and evaluation of instruction. Directed observations in local schools would be required. Students will be teaching several biotechnology micro lessons in a public school setting.

BIOT 5893 Biotechnology in Crop Improvement 3 hours
Prerequisite: PSCI-4833 and Graduate Committee Consent
In this course students will familiarize with the application of biotechnology in improving economic crop plants for high value traits. Students will learn to apply the fundamental concepts of regeneration and micropropagation of plants, molecular biology, genetic engineering, gene expression, progeny evaluation, gene cloning, and resistance to assorted stresses of plants in seeking solutions to various challenges in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement. Novel techniques for enhancing crop productivity and sustainability will be emphasized.

BIOT 5923 Food Safety Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Through this course students will comprehend principles of and problems in evaluating the wholesomeness / safety of bioengineered plant- and animal-based foods, food components as well as intentional and unintentional additives. Biotechnological controls of food borne microorganisms in foods and food processing systems will be emphasized in order to give the students hands-on experience.

BIOT 5973 Industrial Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
In this course, students will learn various technologies involved in the industrial production of biological products and crucial issues related to the biotechnology industry. Primary focus will be on fermenter design and operation, downstream processing, and production of primary and secondary metabolites, industrial enzymes and other raw materials, and biofuels. Classroom discussions will be extended to specific pharmaceuticals, biosensors, regulatory issues, and phytoremediation.

BIOT 6001 Graduate Seminar 1 hour
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will participate in the discussion of important current developments in agricultural biotechnology, and review current scientific literature on selected topics. They will learn and practice techniques of preparing talks and making effective scientific presentations to their peers and to the FVSU faculty utilizing the latest technologies. This course may be repeated for additional course credit requirements.

BIOT 6053 Bioinformatics 3 hours
Prerequisite: Computer Literacy, Molecular Biology Literacy, Graduate Committee Consent
In this course, students will acquire fundamental knowledge of key concepts employed in the application of bioinformatics. Students will garner the essential skills for applying statistical and database tools, as well as standard algorithms to the problems related to the biological sequence analyses. Students enrolled in this course will be able to use the computational techniques and software to convert data from biochemical experiments into useful information.

BIOT 6143 Environmental Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1105, BIOL 4234, PSCI 4863 and Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed to examine the role of biotechnology in evaluating, monitoring, and improving the quality of an environment. Clean up procedures for contaminated environments that include bioremediation / phytoremediation will be discussed. The course will focus on microbial removal, chemical degradation, biological waste treatment systems, and removal of toxic metals and radionucleotides from contaminated soil and water using phytoremediation.

BIOT 6193 Commercial Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: BUSA 4353 or Equivalent and Graduate Committee Consent
This course will provide students an understanding of various issues, strategies, and technologies of the biotechnology industry keeping in focus needed methods for planning and organizing the biotechnology ventures. The elements of a business plan will be considered along with methods for assessing needs for capital, personnel, technology, and marketing sectors. Approached to marketing technology and developing joint ventures will be discussed relative to biotechnology.

BIOT 6253 Molecular Endocrinology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will acquire an in depth knowledge of the molecular basis for hormone action as well as molecular and cell biology on endocrine systems. Other discussions included will be the detailed studies of hormone and receptor synthesis, second messenger models, hormonal control of gene expression, and molecular mechanisms of growth and reproduction. Students will make critical review of literature and will gain thorough knowledge of the emerging endocrinology techniques.

BIOT 6283 Molecular Pharmacology and Toxicology 3 hours
Prerequisite None / Graduate Committee Consent
This course will familiarize students with the concepts of pharmacology as well as toxicology. Students will learn how exogenously applied chemicals affect the mammalian body functions. Students will examine uses and manufacturers of various pharmaceutical products on the market. Classroom discussions will highlight applications / relevance of this course in their graduate program.

BIOT 6353 Nanobiotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will be provided a history of biotechnological nano-devices, with relevant discussions about various aspects of nanobiotechnology. The prime focus will be on the intermolecular interactions, nanofabrications involved in nanobiotechnology, biosensors / biochips, microfluidics, nanostructures (mostly protein based) and the quantum dots. Finally, significant impact of nanobiotechnology will be discussed with a focus as related to electronics, fluidics, and assorted biological processes.

BIOT 6373 Gamete and Embryo Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will understand physiological aspects of mammalian gametes, pre-implantation embryos and their control mechanisms. This course will address utilization of gametes as biotechnological tools for basic research and application in the medical and animal industries. Topics of discussion will include germ cell migration and differentiation, spermatogenesis, capacitation, acrosome reaction, oogenesis, meiosis, oocyte maturation, fertilization, embryo production in vitro and control mechanisms.

BIOT 6393 Microbial Biotechnology 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed for students to understand microbial diversity and its agricultural uses for food and energy production, health, environment, and industry. The primary emphasis is on the application of molecular genetics in microbial biotechnology. Students will develop an understanding of complex strategies involved in biotechnological process through coverage of such topics as isolation and genetic improvement of microorganisms and their mode of growth.

BIOT 6403 Global Issues in Biotechnology 3 hours

Prerequisite: PHIL 2002 and Graduate Committee Consent

Through this course students will understand the role of plants in the world ecosystem and the relationship between plants and the people. Genetically modified crop plants will be focused relative to consumers and the environment. Biotechnology will be discussed emphasizing conventional agriculture, organic farming, and sustainable production. Patents, GMOs and other ethical and moral issues will be focused. Role of biotechnology in combating bioterrorism and crime, marine biology, gene therapy, bioassays, and various diagnostics procedures will be highlighted.

BIOT 6483 Molecular Immunology 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 4863 and Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed as an advanced course for students who have taken an undergraduate course in immunology. Recent immunological advances as they relate to the response of genetically modified organisms will be discussed using the available scientific literature. These discussions will emphasize biotechnology and molecular aspects of immunology.

BIOT 6513 Computational Biology 3 hours
Prerequisite: Computer Literacy, Molecular Biology Literacy, Graduate Committee Consent
This course is designed to expose students to an overview of significant applications of the computer science to solve problems in biology. Students will develop fundamental skills for the application of data analyses and their theoretical methods with mathematical modeling and computational simulation techniques to studies of biological, behavioral, and social systems.

BIOT 6523 Communications in Biotechnology 3 hours
In this course, students will learn to apply information from computerized DNA databases for necessary applications. They will comprehend basic principles of technical and scientific writing and develop oratory skills for technical presentations and disseminating their research findings. Students will participate in discussions on important current developments in agricultural and biomedical biotechnology and review existing scientific literature on topics of their interest. They will practice techniques of preparing talks and making effective scientific presentations to their peers and the FVSU faculty using the latest technologies.

BIOT 6533 Biotechnology of Specialty Plants 3 hours
Prerequisite: BOTN 2001K, PSCI 4863, and Graduate Committee Consent
This course is developed to teach students the emerging uses of plants for various purposes like herbs and spices, perfumes, fibers, dyes, and tannins, medicines and nutraceuticals, hydrogels, latex, and resins, and bioenergy products like biodiesel and bioethanol.

BIOT 6663 Bioprocess Technology 3 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111, MATH 1112, CHEM 1211, -1212K, PHYS 1111, PHYS 1112K, BIOL 4234K
This course will introduce students to principles, applications, and the potential of bioprocess technology. Primary focus for the classroom discussions will be on the processes and process variables, mass balances, energy balances, mole balances, conversion and reaction sizing, fermentation systems, downstream processing, heat transfer sterilization, bioreactor designs, and scale-up, microbial kinetics and bioreactor operations, and bioprocess unit operations for production of bioenergy / biofuels as well as other bioproducts.

BIOT 6753 Bioethics and Regulatory Issues 3 hours
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
This course will discuss ethical and regulatory issues related to biotechnology. Students in this course will comprehend the moral and ethical issues that have arisen from genetic engineering and molecular manipulation of living organisms. Regulatory and business aspects pertaining to biotechnology applications will be emphasized. Impacting bioethical as well as regulatory issues will be discussed in relation to the biotechnology divide and advancing modernization.

BIOT 6801 Forensic Biotechnology 1 hour
Prerequisite: None / Graduate Committee Consent
Students will master concepts related to DNA structure and genetic testing, and will analyze forensic evidences for criminal investigations using techniques in biotechnology. Students will learn how to identify and detect criminal suspects using DNA recovered from the crime scenes, exonerate the innocent, identify mass disaster victims, establish paternity relationships, and identify endangered and protected species using DNA technology. Students will learn to apply the information from a DNA computerized database for necessary applications.

BIOT 6993 Master’s Thesis Research 3 hours
Prerequisite: BIOT Core and Majority of Biotechnology Majors, and Graduate Committee Consent
Those students requiring a thesis will be embarking on a two-semester thesis research program which will include an independent research project following completion of required biotechnology courses. The thesis projects will be hypothesis-based original research studies. For the thesis research, students will be required to submit a proposal for review and approval by the faculty advisor(s) and the biotechnology program committee at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester for initiating research work. Students will meet faculty advisor(s) periodically for discussions on the progress of research.

CHEM 5304 Environmental Analyses 2 hours lecture/ 3 hours lab
Students learn fundamental field collecting methods and field and laboratory analytical procedures for various contaminants of air, water and soil. (Required for concentration)

COUN 5413 Fundamentals of Guidance and Counseling 3 hours
Students will be introduced to the principles of counseling and guidance services including an analysis of these services and the appropriate organization, resources, and techniques for making these services effective in meeting the needs of the individual, the school and society. This course will prepare graduates to function effectively as professional counselors with the knowledge of expected roles, ethical standards, and public policy issues related to educational institutions.

COUN 5423 Seminar in School Counseling 3 hours
Students will learn the coverage and application of guidance and counseling approaches appropriate for the developmental stages and needs of children and adolescents. An emphasis will be placed upon counseling activities related to the developmental stages that assist students and parents at points of educational transition such as academic advisement, assessment, career and educational goals. This course will provide graduates with the necessary information and skills in helping students and parents secure, identify, interpret and use information in decision making.

COUN 5433 Drugs and Behavior 3 hours
Students will learn the effect and treatment of psychoactive drugs. Emphasis will be placed on classification, mechanism of action, history, incidence of use and behavioral effects of major drugs. Students will develop knowledge and application in the treatment of substance abusers, including personal and social factors of substance abuse and available community resources. Graduates will be able to function as entry level A&D counselors under supervision.

COUN 5443 Career Development 3 hours
Students will explore the types and uses of information and techniques to facilitate and enhance training, educational, occupational, and retirement choices of individuals within the context of multiple roles and milieus. It stresses related counseling opportunities that will assist the counselee in formulating comprehensive career plans. Students practice the use of career counseling and development theories and techniques that will enable the graduates to perform the expected career counseling functions of the school counselor. The utilization of the internet and other technologies is emphasized.

COUN 5453 Psychopathology 3 hours
Students will acquire a thorough knowledge on theories of normalcy with special attention to types of maladjustive behavior. They will utilize study approach to analysis of problems confronting teachers, counselors, and students.

COUN 5463 Human Growth and Development 3 hours
Students will be exposed to the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels. The course is designed to include: theories of human development and transitions across the life span; theories of learning and personality development, human behavior including an understanding of developmental crises. This course will enable graduates to apply the theories of human development as they interact with counselors, parents, helping professionals and community groups.

COUN 5483 Organization and Administration of Helping Programs 3 hours
Students will be acquainted with the structure and management of helping agencies. Careful attention is given to an analysis of school curricula to show factors influencing their structure and the impact of community resources. Students will focus their attention upon identification and utilization of community resources in all helping agencies, such as rehabilitation services, mental health centers, and other helping agencies. A variety of activities will be provided that will enable graduates to organize and administer helping services.

COUN 5533 Fundamentals of Statistics and Measurement 3 hours
Students will be introduced to the concepts and techniques of statistical computation and analysis. The students will develop skills and knowledge needed to use statistics in professional endeavors including basic research, program evaluation, data and test analysis. This course will enable graduates to perform basic statistical applications expected of helping professionals.

COUN 5543 Fundamentals of Research 3 hours
Students will be introduced to research in the social disciplines–its meaning, its essentials, its methods and techniques. Students become familiar with topics including characteristics of categories of research designs, sampling techniques, internal and external validity, writing research proposals, and applications to program evaluation.

COUN 5553 Social and Cultural Diversity 3 hours
Students will acquire thorough knowledge about issues and trends in a multicultural and diverse society. The content will include: multicultural and pluralistic trends including characteristics and concerns of diverse groups; attitudes and behavior based on such factors as age, race, religious preference, physical disability, gender, ethnicity and culture, family patterns, socioeconomic status, and intellectual ability. This course will enable graduates to deliver counseling services that take into consideration the needs of a diverse clientele.

COUN 5623 Counseling Theories and Process 3 hours
Students will acquire knowledge and skills to apply various theories of counseling with an emphasis on the application of techniques through observation, role playing, and experiential activities. The contents of this course will provide graduates with the necessary experiences to deliver counseling services to individuals in schools, mental health centers, rehabilitation services and other helping agencies.

COUN 5633 Group Theory and Process 3 hours
Students will gain knowledge and skills to apply group theories of counseling with an emphasis on the application of techniques through observation, role playing, and experiential activities. The contents of this course will provide graduates with the necessary experiences to deliver counseling services to groups in schools, mental health centers, rehabilitation services and other helping agencies.

COUN 5643 Family Counseling and Guidance 3 hours
Students will be introduced to the history of marriage and family counseling/therapy including philosophical, etiological premises that define the practice of family counseling/therapy. This course will enable graduates to apply theoretical models and develop the skills needed for application of these models in schools, mental health and other human services settings expected of helping professionals.

COUN 5653 Behavior Assessment/Modification 3 hours
Students will acquire clinical procedures and techniques of assessment and modification of human behavior. Students will be introduced to the principles of learning along with practical information and application of specific procedures necessary to successfully measure and modify behavior. Graduates will be able to develop and implement behavior management programs in schools, mental health centers, rehabilitation services and other helping facilities.

COUN 5663 Cross-Cultural Counseling 3 hours
Students will gain knowledge, skills and application of the psychological and sociological factors influencing the behaviors of persons in a global society. Emphasis will be placed on race, ethnicity, gender, culture, age and special populations. This course will enable graduates to be sensitive to socio-cultural issues as they deliver counseling services to diverse populations in schools, mental health centers, rehabilitation services and other helping agencies.

COUN 5713 Psychological Testing 3 hours
Students will be familiar with standardized instruments for measuring, diagnosing and interpreting scholastic aptitude, personality, interest and achievement as well as teachermade tests. The emphasis is on group measures with an observation of individual tests. This course enables students to select, administer, score and interpret tests administered in educational and occupational settings.

COUN 5733 Psychological Evaluation, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 3 hours
Students will learn the practice of assessment and diagnostic techniques appropriate for children, adolescents and adults. Students will engage in the administration, scoring and interpretation of individual tests of intelligence, selected non-cognitive instruments, intake procedures, psycho-social assessment, treatment planning and interviewing techniques. Graduates will be able to apply selected models and methods for assessing mental status, identification of psychopathological behavior and interpretation of findings according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM).

ECSP 5424 Diversity and Differentiated Instruction 3 hours
Teachers in this course will explore the learning characteristics and needs of diverse student populations. Teachers will examine the social, cultural, and educational factors influencing the provision of successful learning opportunities for diverse students. The course will require that teachers demonstrate the ability to plan, implement, and effectively evaluate differentiated instruction, as well as provide support for a variety of instructional needs. Graduate students will examine both current trends and historical foundations regarding these factors, especially as they impact the selection and implementation of curricula. Students will also integrate curricular, assessment, and management skills as they support learning for diverse populations.

ECSP 5425 – Educational Assessment and Program Planning 3 hours
Assessment experience in assessing students with and without disabilities is provided. Formal and informal assessment procedures are covered. Students will receive an introduction to standardized tests, criterion referenced and informal measures used in assessing children for educational placement and instruction. Students are required to administer, score, and interpret tests commonly used with exceptional children.

ECSP 5426 Trends and Issues in Mathematics for Early Childhood Education 3 hours
An examination of the contemporary trends and issues in mathematics education in the P-5 setting. Focus will be on research-based investigation of the content in mathematics. Topics include, but are not limited to: research on constructivism, cooperative learning, technology, problem solving, and literature in mathematics and multicultural issues in the teaching of mathematics.

ECSP 5427 Ethics and the Law 3 hours
This course provides a critical appraisal of the current nature, scope, and dimensions of contemporary and traditional education, special education, and inclusive education at the local, state, and national levels. Special emphasis is placed on the roles of both regular and special educators as collaborative teachers in inclusive settings. In addition, theoretical, legal, and practical issues and recent research and program development and evaluation concerned with the treatment, education, and rehabilitation of exceptional individuals are extensively reviewed. Topics include teacher employment rights, student rights, special education law, religion and the public school, and teacher liability. The utilization of current and emerging technologies in the educational process is emphasized.

ECSP 5428 Using Instructional Strategies in the Content Areas 3 hours
This course focuses on curriculum development and instructional procedures in the content areas at the elementary school. Attention is given to research, theory, practice, current issues and trends applicable to teaching and learning in the elementary classroom. Emphasis is placed on the roles of the teacher, classroom learning environments, curriculum integration, and instructional planning and teaching models. The utilization of current and emerging technologies in the educational process is emphasized as is the impact of curriculum design and implementation on the education of students with and without special needs.

ECSP 5429 Family Support and Intervention 3 hours
This course promotes an understanding of stressors, transitions, and issues that families of children with disabilities encounter during their child’s lifespan. Approaches such as transdisciplinary teaming, family-centered intervention will be covered.

ECSP 5623 Methods and Problems of Teaching in ECSP 3 hours
Students will study the nature and curriculum needs of the early childhood/special education learner. Early Childhood/Special Education program rationale, curriculum, organizational patterns, instructional alternatives and problems will be discussed.

EDLD 5203 Foundations of Professional Ethics and School Law 3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide education graduate candidates with the foundations of professional ethics and school law. Increasingly, faculty, counselors, and administrators in public and private schools are called upon to make tough choices in their work and in their lives with regard to what is legal and what is ethical. This course will utilize lecture and case study methodologies to explore legal situations and ethical dilemmas in the practice of education, which might be specifically applied to teachers, counselors, or administrators.

EDMG 5613 Curriculum Needs of the Transescent Learner 3 hours
Students will study current trends in curriculum design and the development and selection of materials to be used at various middle grade levels.

EDMG 5623 Methods and Problems of Teaching in the Middle Grades 3 hours
Students will study the nature and curriculum needs of middle childhood. Middle Grades program rationale, curriculum, organizational patterns, instructional alternatives and problems will be discussed.

EDMG 6001 Comprehensive Review 0 hour
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the Middle Grades Education discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U.

EDSC 5013 Evaluation and Testing in Education 3 hours
Candidates will experience educational and psychological evaluations used in P-12 schools. Attention will be given to the essentials of a quality instrument and how it is assessed for usefulness, so that candidates will learn to select, administer and interpret test instruments and their results. Program evaluation will also be studied, including sensitivity to issues of diversity. This course is not required prior to entrance into the field experience.

EDSC 5033 Career Counseling 3 hours
Candidates will experience career information and technologies to explore current educational, occupational, and retirement choices that are present throughout the life cycle, particularly in grades P-12. They will learn career counseling approaches that will enable them to advise candidates and assist them in developing a comprehensive career plan. Candidates will also create a comprehensive plan for themselves.

EDSC 5103 Human Growth and Development 3 hours
This course addresses human growth and development across the life span but particularly emphasizes the P-12 years. Candidates will study the intellectual, social, emotional, and moral stages of human development, with attention to multicultural and diversity issues. Candidates’ writing skills will be developed, and in order for candidates to more adequately respond to the needs of their students, they will explore developmentally appropriate counseling and programming, including the use of technology. It is preferable that this course be taken prior to entrance into the field experience.

EDSC 5123 Introduction to School Counseling 3 hours
This course introduces candidates to the requirements of the university, Graduate Studies, the College of Education (CoE), and the School Counselor Education program. Each aspect of the total program is considered, focusing primarily on the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) model. Candidates will explore the impact that school counseling as a profession has on the lives of candidates and their families. THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED DURING THE FIRST SEMESTER OF THE PROGRAM.

EDSC 5143 Counseling Theories 3 hours
Candidates will acknowledge the uniqueness of school counseling as compared to other helping professions, and then progressively add counseling skills, problem-solving strategies, and one expressive therapy to their understanding. Seven theoretical orientations must be understood as candidates begin to develop a personal counseling position paper for their portfolios. Counseling simulations will be evaluated as part of the course. THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED DURING THE FIRST SEMESTER IN THE PROGRAM.

EDSC 5203 Counseling Diverse Populations 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDSC 5143 Counseling Theories
This course reconsiders counseling theories in order to more adequately apply interventions to other cultural groups. Candidates will explore a variety of cultures and settings through field trips, speakers, literature, and other media. A personal project helps candidates to identify their own cultural influences and the impact of that culture on their lives. This course is not required to be taken prior to entrance into the field experience.

EDSC 5223 Comprehensive School Counseling 3 hours
Understanding the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) model for a comprehensive school counseling program is the foundation for a comprehensive school counseling program, its application is the foundation of this course. Specific activities include evaluation of existing school programs with ASCA and the Professional Standard Commission (PSC) requirements for school counselors. A major activity is the design and planning of an age-appropriate comprehensive school counseling program to accomplish set goals. THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED DURING THE SECOND SEMESTER OF THE PROGRAM.

EDSC 5233 Counseling Interventions and Prevention 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDSC 5143 Counseling Theories
Basic concepts for understanding applied crisis intervention will prepare school counselors with essential counseling knowledge to consider school and personal transitions that occur in the lives of P-12 candidates and craft interventions to assist them. Interventions can occur before the transition and be preventive in nature; whereas, others occur at crisis points. Counselors are leaders in the school can learn how to advocate for these programs, resources, and structures. THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED DURING THE SECOND SEMESTER IN THE PROGRAM AND MUST BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO ENTRANCE INTO FIELD EXPERIENCE.

EDSC 5303 School and Family Consultation 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDSC 5143 Counseling Theories and EDSC 5373 Group Counseling
This course explores counseling with more than one person at a time through discussion of several consultation models along with family systems theory to increase candidates’ appreciation for the context in which their candidates are functioning. A variety of school and family difficulties will be discussed, simulated, and critiqued. This course is not required prior to entrance into the field experience.

EDSC 5373 Group Counseling 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDSC 5143 Counseling Theories
This course deals with counseling more than one person at a time (followed by EDSC 5373, School and Family Consultation). Candidates are required to learn skills in the areas of planning, analysis of interactions, and leadership to be successful. Groups will be discussed, simulated, performed, and critiqued. This class includes a 10-hour group experience that requires participation outside of class. THIS COURSE IS REQUIRED DURING THE THIRD SEMESTER IN THE PROGRAM AND MUST BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO ENTRANCE TO THE FIELD EXPERIENCE.

EDSC 5793 School Counseling Practicum 3 hours
Prerequisites: EDSC 514, Counseling Theories; EDSC 5123 Introduction to School Counseling; EDSC 5233 Counseling Interventions and Prevention; EDSC 5213 Comprehensive School Counseling; EDSC 5373 Group Counseling; EDUC 5203 Ethical and Legal Issues
Supervised counseling skills development through active learning methods and evaluation practice is provided in this course. Candidates will increase their levels of counseling experience prior to field placements. They will discuss and demonstrate a variety of strategies through a supervised process, and interactions with peers and professionals on campus and in the field. Service learning is included to enhance the experience for candidates, the university, and the community.

EDSC 5800 Special Topics in School Counseling 1 or 2 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the School Counselor Education discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require candidates to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the candidate’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

In school counseling the different sections will be applied in the following ways:

  • Section 70, Fundamentals of Research Design
  • Section 71, Career Counseling
  • Section 72, Counseling Theories
  • Section 73, Group Counseling
  • Section 74, Counseling Diverse Populations
  • Section 75, Comprehensive School Counseling
  • Section 76, Foundations of Professional Ethics and School Law
  • Section 77, School and Family Consultation
  • Section 78, Evaluation and Testing

EDSC 5893 School Counseling Internship I 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDSC 5793 School Counseling Practicum
Internship will provide candidates with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class to the school setting and actual school counseling programs in the field. Combining theory with practice enables candidates to refine and demonstrate skills in all areas of the professional practices of a school counselor educator. The successful candidate will have one half of the required field experience hours towards professional certification.

EDSC 5993 School Counseling Internship II 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDSC 5893 School Counseling Internship I
Internship will provide candidates with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class to the school setting and actual school counseling programs in the field. Combining theory with practice enables them to refine and demonstrate skills in all areas of the professional practices of a school counselor educator. The successful candidate will model behavior that meets the standards of professional and ethical practice, be able to precisely and correctly write and analyze reports, and engage in professional counseling activities. The successful candidate will have one half of the required field experience hours towards professional certification.

EDSC 6002 Comprehensive Review 0 hour
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the School Counselor Education discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U.

EDSC 6123 Diagnosis and Treatment 3 hours
Candidates will learn the basics of diagnosing and treating maladjustive behavior using the current Dictionary of Statistical Measurement (DSM) materials. While all five axes will receive attention, the focus will predominantly be on Axes I and II.

EDSC 6143 Clinical Supervision 3 hours
Candidates will discuss and demonstrate a variety of supervision strategies through a supervised process and interactions with peers. Development of these skills will increase their levels of counseling supervision experience prior to field placements. Service learning is included to enhance the experience for candidates, the university, and the community.

EDSC 6263 Advanced Seminar in Student Issues 3 hours
Candidates will read primary resources and research in a particular topic facing P-12 students. While the topic may include exceptionalities, this course may also focus on more typical issues. They will make a presentation on some aspect of the issue and integrate the information into their personal counseling position paper. THIS COURSE CAN BE TAKEN MORE THAN ONCE AS THE TOPIC(S) TO BE STUDIED IS (ARE) CHANGED. 

EDSC 6363 Advanced Seminar in Counseling Theories 3 hours
Candidates will read primary resources and research in a particular orientation. They will make a presentation on some aspect of the approach and integrate the information into their personal counseling position paper. THIS COURSE CAN BE TAKEN MORE THAN ONCE AS THE THEORY (THEORIES) TO BE STUDIED IS (ARE) CHANGED.

EDSC 6463 Counseling Children 3 hours
Activity-based counseling is an essential component of counseling in the lower grades. Participants in this course will learn a variety of expressive processes, including art, manipulation of objects and toys, and role play, and collect a variety of objects the use in these processes. They will apply this information to actual clients.

EDSC 6563 Advanced Career Counseling 3 hours
Candidates in this course will become experts in Georgia 411 and GCIS and GCIS Junior. They will strategize how to utilize this information, apply their strategy, and critiques their results. 

EDSC 6663 Advanced Multicultural Studies 3 hours
While continuing to add to their fund of knowledge of the five major cultural groups in Georgia (i.e., African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, Native American, and Caucasian American), candidates will also examine the impact of learning styles, multi-intelligences, economics, and other less visible issues on themselves and their students.

EDSC 6763 Leading Groups in Schools 3 hours
In addition to strengthening candidates’ understanding of the theories involved in leading small groups psycho-educational and counseling sessions, considerable time will be spent doing service learning groups in a variety of school settings.

EDSC 6853 Practicum in Supervision 3 hours
Development of supervision of counseling skills will be enhanced through active learning methods and evaluation practice as provided in this course. Candidates will increase their levels of counseling supervision experience prior to field placements. Candidates will discuss and demonstrate a variety of supervision strategies through their supervision, interactions with peers, and time with professionals on campus and in the field. Service learning is included to enhance the experience for candidates, the university, and the community.

EDUC 5203 Foundations of Professional Ethics and Law  3 hours
The purpose of this course is to provide counselor education graduates with the foundations of professional ethics and school law. Increasingly, faculty, counselors, and administrators in public and private schools are called upon to make tough choices in their work and in their lives with regard to what is legal and what is ethical. This course will utilize lecture and case study methodologies to explore legal situations and ethical dilemmas in the practice of education, which might be specifically applied to teachers, counselors, or administrators.

EDUC 5253 The Exceptional Child 3 hours
This course is designed to discuss the nature, cause, and treatment of children’s disabilities and their influence on emotional, social, educational, and vocational adjustments; special services required for exceptional children to develop to their maximum capacities including the academically talented and mentally retarded.

EDUC 5423 Seminar in Social Issues and Comparative Education 3 hours
Seminar participants analyze the relationship between education and society, examining such issues as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in comparative perspectives. Data and models from selected nations, including emerging economically developed countries, are used. Emphasis is on free, analytical discussions of issues in American education as compared to similar issues in other countries.

EDUC 5503 Fundamentals of Research Design 3 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the logic and methodology of educational research as well as the statistical design in education research. Emphasis is on preparing and designing a research proposal for action research.

EDUC 5603 Instructional Leadership 3 hours
The basic concepts of supervision, its contribution to the total school program, and means of improving instruction through supervision.

EDUC 5783 Applied Inferential Statistic and Research Design 3 hours
This course is designed to introduce the student to the logic and methodology of educational research as well as to statistical designs in educational research. Emphasis is on experimental methodology with treatment of selected non-experimental treatments. Inferential statistics, including t-test analysis and analysis of variance and covariance will be presented.

EDUC 5793 Applied Research Practicum 3 hours
Prerequisite: EDUC 5503 Fundamentals of Research Design
In this course, the candidates will conduct an applied research project that was defined in Fundamentals of Research (EDUC 5503). Candidates will demonstrate the ability to conduct action research by identifying a topic area or issue that deserves attention, reviewing contemporary literature related to that topic, designing and conducting a project to address the issue, and drawing conclusions from the results and reporting the conclusions both orally and in writing. This research will meet the needs of diverse learners and impact candidate learning and will serve as Key Assessment #7 for the Advanced Educational Programs from the Unit Assessment System of Fort Valley State University.

EDUC 5800 Special Topics 1 – 3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the (Early Childhood- Exceptional Child/Middle Grades Education/School Counselor Education) discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

EDUC 6133 Using the SPSS Statistical Package 3 hours
This course trains candidates to use the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to perform statistical analyses on data. It will enhance candidates’ knowledge of the logic and methodology of educational research as well as the statistical design in education research. Emphasis is on analyzing action research.

EDUC 6423 Seminar in Social Issues and Comparative Education 3 hours
Course participants analyze the relationship between education and society, examining such issues as race, ethnicity, class, and gender in comparative perspectives. Data and models from selected nations, including emerging economically developed countries, are used. Emphasis is on free, analytical discussions of issues in American education as compared to similar issues in other countries.

EDUC 6663 Advanced Multicultural Studies 3 hours
While continuing to add to their fund of knowledge of the five major cultural groups in the Georgia (i.e., African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, Native American, and Caucasian American), candidates will also examine the impact of learning styles, multi-intelligences, economics, and other less visible issues on themselves and their students.

EDUC 6863 Research Project 3-6 hours
Candidates who have not designed, conducted, and reported on a graduate level field-based project will use 3-6 hours of their electives to complete this requirement. They will be able to plan, organize, conduct, and present a research project consistent with their program (e.g., comprehensive school counseling, middle grades, early childhood/special education programs). They may prefer to take less than 3 hours of course-work per semester and spread their research activities over several semesters.

EDUC 6990 Thesis 6-9 hours
Prerequisite: permission of the dean
Research for the preparation of the master’s thesis.

ENGL 5003 Communication Arts 3 hours
Students will study various systems of English grammar, with emphasis on their application to writing and teaching.

ENGL 5023 Teaching Literature in the Middle Grades 3 hours
A course designed to introduce to middle grades teachers a variety of classroom approaches to literature. It will include working with a variety of genres and multicultural texts. Students will begin a resource file of texts and teaching strategies.

ENGL 5423 American Literature II 3 hours
An intensive study of major authors, genres, and movements in American literature from the close of the Civil War through present day.

ENVH 5113 Environmental Pollution 3 hours
Students primarily review sources, features and control of air, water and soil contaminants as well as their interactions once introduced to the environment and living organisms. (Required for concentration)

ENVH 5183 Environmental Law 3 hours
Students study federal, state and local laws and regulations related to the protection of human health and the regulation of environmental contaminants. Students examine the interactions between and differing responsibilities of the various agencies in enforcing them. They also discuss environmental litigation and citizen rights.

ENVH 5193 Environmental Health Hazard Management 3 hours
Students review processes available for hazard monitoring, control and remediation of soil, water and air pollutants as well as various toxic materials used by local industries and agriculture.

ENVH 5253 Industrial Hygiene 3 hours
Students will study the effects of occupational hazards like noise, gases, particulates and radiation on human health and work-related disorders.

ENVH 5800 Special Topics in Public Health 1-3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the Public Health discipline.  The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

ENVH 6001 Comprehensive Review 0 hour
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the Environmental Health discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U.

EPSY 5513 Pre-Adolescent Psychology 3 hours
A scientific study of the developmental changes in puberty in relation to physical, mental, emotional, and social development. This course involves examination of the developmental changes leading up to and at puberty, the social, mental, emotional, and physical changes that impact learning in the contemporary classroom. The influence of the peer and learning environments on preadolescent development and learning are topics of primary focus.

FVSU 0500 Graduate Studies Orientation 0 hour
In this orientation course, students will examine the requirements for successful graduate study. Students will complete writing samples and be referred for practice and review as necessary. Assignments will include the application of concepts involved in graduate policies and procedures, graduate student conduct and disposition, intellectual property, and original research. The course is required but carries no credit. It will include at least two face-to-face meetings and the remainder will be online. It will be completed by the drop day of the full semester during the student’s first semester enrollment.

GEOL 5203 Environmental Geology 3 hours
Students examine human interactions with the geologic environment. Geologic hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions will be considered as well as their contributions to environmental pollution.

GERO 5413 Introduction to Gerontology 3 hours
Students will be given with an overview of the field of gerontology including demographics, multi-disciplinary theories, services, and other selected health and psychological issues related to aging.

GERO 5423 Legal and Social Issues in Gerontology 3 hours
Students will be exposed to laws affecting people working with elderly individuals in the public health field, providing a guide to issues including information access, whistleblowing, HIV/AIDS, consent to treatment, elder abuse, and mental health. Issues of social economic policy affecting older adults are discussed including pensions, retirement, insurance and social security, and economic planning.

GERO 5433 Counseling the Elderly 3 hours
Students will be provided with skills to use knowledge-based techniques and methodologies in making counseling evaluations and interventions using case study material and examples. Specific content includes individual counseling, family counseling, and adaption to diverse work environments.

GERO 5623 Human Service Systems for the Aged 3 Hours
Students will develop a working knowledge of past, current, and potential local, state, and federal policy and programming for older adults. Course content covers governmental agencies that primarily serve the aged and emphasizes management and policy development tools for professionals.

GERO 5713 Introduction to the Psychology and Biology of Aging 3 hours
Students will be given an overview of developmental changes that occur with the aging process. Typical and atypical psychological and biological occurrences are discussed in relation to how older people cope with their changing life circumstances.

GERO 5723 Wellness Promotion and Health in Aging Population 3 hours
Students will learn about normal aging and the life span with emphasis on the genetic and environmental factors influencing the aging process. Course content focuses on individuals with special needs such as those with disabilities, in minorities, and living in rural areas.

GERO 5800 Special Topics in Gerontology 1-3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the Gerontology discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

HLTH 5100 Introduction to Public Health
This course introduces students to the foundations of the public health infrastructure within the United States with emphasis on how public health impacts human populations and the various entities that make up the discipline.

HLTH 5103 – Environmental Health 3 hours
Students will diagnose and investigate environmental factors, including biological, physical and chemical factors, which affect the health of a community.

HLTH 5173 Public Health Policy and Administration 3 hours
Students will acquire knowledge of the formulation, analysis and implementation of public health policy; and the planning, organization, administration, management, and evaluation of health programs.

HLTH 5123 Epidemiology 3 hours
Students will learn about distributions and determinants of disease, disabilities and death in human populations; the characteristics and dynamics of human populations; and the natural history of health and disease.

HLTH 5153 Biostatistics 3 hours
Students will learn concepts and practice of statistical data analysis; collection, management, analysis and interpretation of health data; and the design and analysis of health related surveys and of experimental and quasi experimental health studies.

HLTH 5200 Health Behavior and Health Promotion 3 hours
Students will acquire concepts and methods of social and behavioral sciences applicable to the study of health behavior and the identification and solution of public health problems.

HLTH 5850 Field Experience in Public Health 1-6 hours
Students will participate in supervised practical experience in a community health setting. 

HLTH 5910 Special Problems in Health Education 3 hours
Students will research on health problems and issues. Students will meet and consult with a professor on a regular basis to discuss the study project.

HLTH 5999 Thesis Research 1-6 hours
Students will learn the techniques of scientific investigation, preparation, and oral defense of a substantial research study in a selected area of environmental health. Done in tutorial consultation with a graduate faculty member.

ITEC 5120 Technology for Classroom Teachers 3 hours
This course immerses teacher education candidates in a technology-rich learning environment designed to build teacher skills in the following areas: use of modern technology, integration of Georgia Performance Standards (and Core Curriculum), new designs for teaching and learning, classroom management and enhanced pedagogical practice.

MAED 5020 Algebra Connections 3 hours
Students will undertake an integrated study of modern algebra and number theoretic structures with a focus on patterns and relationships.  Real-world problem solving and a variety of learning experiences will be used to broaden the student’s understanding of key mathematical concepts that undergird the arithmetic and algebra taught in the middle grades.  The graphic calculator or computer algebra systems will be used to investigate mathematical models and solve real-world problems.

MAED 5030 Geometry and Measurement 3 hours
An investigative approach to the study of Euclidean, Non-Euclidean and transformation geometry that enriches students’ knowledge of the concepts, principles and process as it relates to the school curriculum.  Students will make conjectures, test and verify properties of geometric figures in the physical world using such tools as the Geometer’s Sketchpad.  Proofs as it relates to geometric concepts and principles will be constructed.

MAED 5301 Numbers and Operations 3 hours
Students will study the Real Number System in-depth with special emphasis on the Rational Number System.  Using technology and instructional aides, students will explore the structure, operations and properties of real numbers and apply those in real-world problem situations.

MAED 6010 Advanced Studies of the Calculus 3 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 4000(Calculus Concepts) or MATH 1154 (Calculus I)
Students will explore the concepts and properties of limits, continuity, the derivative, differential equation and the definite and indefinite integrals.  The use of a graphing calculator or compute algebra system will deepen students’ knowledge about the role of calculus in modeling dynamic change and application problems dynamic change and application problems.

MAED 6020 Probability and Statistics 3 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 6010 or an equivalent
Students will use basic concepts of probability and statistics with applications.  Topics include: probability models; random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions; statistical estimation and testing; confidence intervals; and an introduction to measures of central tendency and variability.  Students will organize and analyze statistical data using statistical packages or other data analytic software.

MATH 5301 Number and Operation Sense 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Degree Program
Students will model, in a variety of ways, basic elements of number and operation. They will demonstrate an understanding of the real number system and various ways of making estimates. Students will use technology, hands-on activities and manipulatives.

MATH 5302 Algebra and Functions 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Degree Program
Students will apply algebra to construct mathematical models for real world problems. Students will apply polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic and trigonometric functions.

MATH 5303 Geometry and Measurement 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Degree Program
Students will demonstrate an understanding of plane, solid, coordinate, transformational and non-Euclidean geometries. They will use visual models and methods to provide insight in thinking about patterns in quantitative and symbolic data.

MATH 5304 Concepts of Calculus 3 hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Degree Program
Students will demonstrate knowledge that calculus provides a language for modeling dynamic change. Students will investigate and apply properties of limit, continuity, derivative and integral.

MATH 5404 Statistics 4 hours
Prerequisite: MATH 2113 or an equivalent course
Students will develop skills needed to do statistical research by expanding their knowledge of statistics through the exploration of hypothesis testing, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and non-parametric statistics. The student will demonstrate an understanding of statistics by completing a statistical research project.

MATH 5900 Special Topics in Mathematics Education 1-5 hours
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
The student will select a topic in mathematics education to explore and will conduct individual study of research under the directions of a mathematics or mathematics education professor.

MLHC 5413 Community Mental Health 3 hours
Students will be introduced with the principles of community mental health. Emphasis is placed on development and expansion of the movement in mental health. Its organization, resources, and techniques for making community services available to meet the needs of the individual and the community are discussed.

MLHC 5422 Seminar in Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice 3 hours
Students will study social, legal, ethical, and economic issues arising in the delivery of professional counseling services as related to settings, socio-cultural groups, social ethnicity, and organizations. Current practices and actual cases will be reviewed.

MLHC 5762 Case Management 2 hours
Students will learn the techniques of critical analysis of representative cases and techniques of case management. Attention is focused on setting up and maintaining records, diagnosis and provision of services as well as providing an understanding of substance abuse problems within various agencies.

MLHC 5770 Supervised Practicum 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or above in MLHC 5413, COUN 5463, COUN 5433, COUN 5453, COUN 5623, COUNG 5633, COUN 5553, COUN 5653, MLHC 5422, COUN 5643, MLHC 5762. Mental Health Counseling majors only
This course requires the student to demonstrate the appropriate use of a variety of counseling skills and techniques.  Audio and video tapes of counseling sessions, both individual and group, are critiqued in class by the instructor.

MLHC 5772 Internship 2 hours
Students will participate in internship experience with a mental health agency. The student will be expected to apply the knowledge, understanding, and skills which he has developed to help his client.

MLHC 5782 Internship 2 hours
Students are expected to participate in a supervised internship experience in a mental health setting appropriate to mental health counseling. The intern will be expected to apply the knowledge, skills and dispositions which she/he has developed to assist clients under the supervision of a site supervisor who has a minimum of a master’s degree in counseling with equivalent qualifications, including appropriate certifications and licenses (e.g., LPC, NCC). The site supervisor has a minimum of two years of pertinent profession experience in the program area and knowledge of the program’s expectations, requirements and evaluation procedures for interns.

MLHC 5800 Special Topics in Mental Health Counseling 1-3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the Mental Health Counseling discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic.

MLHC 6001 Comprehensive Review 0 hour
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the Mental Health Counseling discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U.

RCCM 5403 Introduction to Rehabilitation 3 hours
Students will be introduced to current rehabilitation theories, principles, methodology and philosophy; legislative history of the federal/state vocational rehabilitation system; the rehabilitation process, counseling concepts, and current trends.

RCCM 5413 Introduction to Case Management 3 hours
Students will explore the following primary case management components within State Federal Rehabilitation: Case finding/referral, intake interviewing, services coordination including planning, implementation, evaluation and follow-up, case recording and reporting, individual and group counseling, decision-making and time management and the Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors.

RCCM 5421 Lifespan Development in Rehabilitation 3 hours
This course provides an overview of the major developmental theories and how they relate to various types of disabilities. It also covers ways in which disability affects developmental stages and how a person with a disability responds and adapts at each stage. Major career development theories are also presented.

RCCM 5423 Medical Case Management 3 hours
Students will be introduced to a variety of disabilities with emphasis being placed on the impact of severe and chronic conditions. Further, students will explore these disabilities in terms of their etiologies, functional limitations, treatment/rehabilitation options, and vocational implications.

RCCM 5432 Psychiatric Rehabilitation 3 hours
This course provides the diagnostic, assessment, and treatment planning for counseling individuals with mental disorder and substance abuse in a variety of community settings, which provide social, vocational, residential and case management services. Students will learn the models and methods for assessing mental status and identify psychological disorders in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical manual (DSM) criteria. Major counseling theories and case management strategies are also presented.

RCCM 5441 Practicum in Rehabilitation 1 hour
Prerequisite:  RCCM 5403, RCCM 5413, RCCM 5423, RCCM 5441, COU N 5623, and COUN 5633
Permission of adviser/instructor. Students must be in good standing with an overall GPA of 3.0 or above and are required to complete and submit the Practicum Application during the semester prior to registration.
Students will be provided with an individualized learning opportunity related to supervise experience working in a public or private agency that provides counseling and/or related rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities. The course instructor will provide on-campus supervision sessions.

RCCM 5452 Rehabilitation Assessment & Evaluation 3 hours
This course will familiarize students with the tenets of measurement theory methods of test construction, appropriateness of individual and group tests based on disability type, test administration and evaluation procedures. The practice of assessment and diagnostic techniques appropriate for children, adolescents, and adults will be covered. Students will engage in the administration, scoring and interpreting of assessments as well as learn intake and interview procedures. 

RCCM 5463 Vocational Rehabilitation 3 hours
Students will be provided an overview of career development theories. Career development will be related to the challenges and barriers associated with disability. Employment development, job seeking and job retention factors that pertain to employment, and career planning for individuals with disabilities who participate in rehabilitation programs are examined. Students will complete a resume, O’Net assignment, Transferability of Work Skills Analysis, Job Analysis, and a mock employment interview within this course. 

RCCM 5473 Introduction to Rehabilitation Technology 3 hours
Students will be introduced to a broad overview of both theoretical and applied issues/concepts of Rehabilitation Assistive Technology as it relates to the field of public and private case management. This will include exposure to computers, software, national technology networking for individuals with disabilities, electronic assistance devices, and telecommunications. The various aspects of assessing individuals with disabilities in all major life areas will be examined as well as assistive technology case management issues. Topics will address referral, evaluation, and planning for home and work place accommodations for individuals possessing various types of disabilities.

RCCM 5483 Cultural Diversity in Counseling  3 hours
This course will familiarize students with different environmental, personal, socioeconomic, and psychological characteristics of various ethnic and cultural groups. Ethical and legal considerations in working with diverse populations will be addressed. 

RCCM 5633 Research and Program Evaluation 3 hours
This course will cover research methods and techniques in the social disciplines. Topics will include research designs, sampling techniques, internal and external validity. This course will also focus on the program evaluation theory with an emphasis placed on survey research techniques. A research proposal and survey instrument will be developed based on the student’s area of interest.

RCCM 5706 Internship in Rehabilitation 6 hours
Prerequisite: The student must have taken and satisfactorily completed the following courses:
RCCM 5403, RCCM 5413, RCCM 5423, RCCM 5441, COU N 5623, and COUN 5633 In addition, students must be in good standing with an overall GPA of 3.0 or above at the start of      their final semester in the program with no outstanding “Incomplete” grades. A student is also required to complete and submit the Student Fieldwork Application at least one semester before registration.
Students will be placed in case management settings most closely associated with their career development needs for this 600-clock hour pragmatic experience with at least 240 hours of direct service to consumers.  Students will be encouraged to apply the knowledge and counseling skills in a clinical setting that they learned in prerequisite courses. In addition, students will be required to receive weekly on-campus supervision from the designated faculty supervisor. The supervision will involve both individual and group discussion of rehabilitation counseling concerns and clinical experiences (on or off campus) that facilitate the development of basic rehabilitation counseling skills.

RCCM 5800 Special Topics in Rehabilitation Counseling & Case Management 1-3 hours
This Special Topics course will explore contemporary issues in the Rehabilitation Counseling and Case Management discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course through a research paper or project. Specific requirements, to include course goals and objectives, course assignments and credit hours for the course will be determined by each program. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course is repeatable for a grade with a different topic. 

RCCM 6001 Comprehensive Review 0 hours
This Comprehensive Review course will explore issues, topics, literature and standards in the Rehabilitation Counseling & Case Management discipline. The course will focus on topics from current research and literature and will require students to demonstrate practical application of the information gained in the course orally and in writing. This course is an elective and can only be taken by permission of the professor of the course and the student’s advisor. The course will be graded as S or U. 

READ 5131 Approaches to Teaching Reading 3 hours
This course provides an overview of basic reading instruction. It includes activities that foster the development of strategic readers, familiarity with current reading resources, integration of technology into literacy education and familiarity with approaches and models of instruction. The course considers the stages of reading development, as well as, effective teaching strategies, assessment techniques and organization for instruction. 

READ 5232 Individualized Assessment and Instruction for Striving Readers 3 hours
Prerequisites: READ 5131 Approaches to Teaching Reading
This course engages students in assessment and instructional techniques used for working with individuals experiencing difficulties with reading. Students examine factors influencing reading abilities and utilize case study approaches to evaluate students’ literacy processes. 

READ 5434 Content Area Literacy 3 hours
In this course candidates are provided opportunities for in-depth study of teaching reading and writing in various subject matter areas. Because it is discipline-based, individuals preparing to teach, or currently teaching, in the middle grades and higher will find the course materials particularly geared to them. Instructional strategies are presented and designed to help students to transfer literacy skills into content areas. 

READ 5535 Trends and Issues in Reading 3 hours
Prerequisites: Admission to the Graduate Teacher Education Program, READ 5131 or READ 5434, READ 5232
This course is designed to investigate the current issues and trends in reading instruction. Emphasis will be on the critical analysis of research literature that is related to current practices and trends in the teaching of reading. Approaches to teaching multi-cultural classes and students with special needs in reading will be learned.


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